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  1. #1

    Should I go for disposable nappies or washable ones?

    Hi everyone,

    I have a sister who believes that using washable nappies are more hygienic and less risky than using disposable ones. My other sister, who is about to give birth next month believes that disposable ones, especially those that are trusted brands, give more comfort to babies. Although I use both. I believe that these nappies both have good and bad sides.

    What do you think?

    Would be glad to hear about your opinions.

  2. #2
    Hi MumO'Three,

    Thank you for your question. It's an interesting post as I am wondering about using real nappies with my next baby.

    We used disposables with my son, mainly for convenience. However, I believe it will be cheaper to use real nappies (especially if you use then on multiple children and you can often purchase them second hand). I also believe real nappies can be more comfortable for babies. Disadvantages of real nappies are: having to do the washing more frequently and having to carry a dirty/wet nappy around with you when you are out. Some people prefer real nappies because they are more environmentally friendly.

    However, I don't think there is a huge difference in the comfort of these types of nappies. I'm not sure what risk with disposable nappies your sister means? I don't believe there is any evidence one nappy type is more likely to lead to infections.

    One reason I went for disposable nappies with my son is that they are easier to get used to putting on etc. Plus, with having my first baby I didn't want to worry about extra washing etc. But for the next baby I am thinking of getting some real nappies to use with my toddler and practising so I know what I am doing when it comes to my newborn! Oh, one more disadvantage of real nappies is the bigger cost upfront (but they are overall cheaper unless you do lots of tumble drying).

    I'll be interested to read other mums opinions on this because, as I say, I only have personal experience with the disposable nappies, so far.....

    Best wishes,

    LJ

  3. #3
    With my first baby, Grandpa and Grandma offered to pay for nappy service, so I went that direction because I liked the idea of having cloth against my baby's skin. The benefit to this was that when she started breastfeeding, she wasn't latching well and wasn't drinking enough. Once I learned how to better latch her on, I then had to count wet nappies to be sure she was getting enough. Counting wet nappies is a lot harder with disposable nappies than it is with cloth.

    But at 5 months of age, my daughter started to get nappies rash, and I realized that the disposable nappies would keep her drier and would also eliminate nappy rash. So I switched and was thrilled with the convenience factor.

    With my 2nd baby I decided to go with a nappy service for the first month, so I could easily count wet nappies if needed. Then we switched to disposables.

    With babies 3, 4 and 5, I never had them in cloth nappies. Just went with disposable from the beginning (all breastfeeding issues had resolved after baby #1).

    Some mums LOVE cloth nappies - they love choosing the covers (or making the covers), they love the challenge of cleaning them, and they love the savings. Cloth nappies have come a long way since I tried them with my youngest children about 20 years ago. You can now get "all in one" nappies that just snap on. No nappy pins needed.

    I had a friend who told me she would reduce landfill by recycling in other areas because she loved the convenience factor of the disposable nappies.

    It's fund to research and make a decision for your personal situation. Here's a video with a little information about cloth vs. disposable nappies.



    Warm Regards,

    Kate

  4. #4
    I do not know if they are necessarily more hygienic, but I am one of those mums who really likes cloth nappies.

    They save money, I think they are probably more comfortable on the baby's bottom, they are cute, and they often facilitate earlier lu training.

    Of course, disposable nappies are convenient and reliable. Many of the newer ones are very absorbent and relatively comfortable, allergen-free.

    SO I think both can be a great options, for different reasons. As a result, parents should choose what they are most comfortable using. A combination of both is a very good, economical, and eco-friendly compromise.

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