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  1. #1
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    Apr 2015
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    Eating papaya in pregnancy

    While I was pregnant, many ladies forbade me to eat papaya as it can cause miscarriage. I didn't find any logical explanation to this. Is there any truth in it or is this just a pregnancy myth?
    Last edited by mum; 16th April 2015 at 12:26 AM.

  2. #2
    Hi mum!

    This is a very interesting question! It reminds me of an article that is presented elsewhere here on "Pregnancy, Birth & Beyond" website... this one is about pineapple, but addresses the same "issue" that you brought up.

    http://www.pregnancy.com.au/pregnanc...regnancy.shtml

    It seems that from what I can find, "UNRIPE" papaya also contains a small amount of a substance that can stimulate contractions... however, you would probably have to eat an incredible amount of it for it to cause any harm. Do not worry about eating ripe papaya, however.

    Here is a cited study on the papaya issue:

    If you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant, avoid eating papaya or using a papaya product. Papaya is sometimes recommended for soothing indigestion, which is a common ailment during pregnancy. Although a fully ripe papaya is not considered dangerous, a papaya that is at all unripe contains a latex substance that triggers uterine contractions and may cause a miscarriage. 1

    The papaya enzyme that helps soothe indigestion is called papain, or vegetable pepsin. Papain is found in the fruit's latex and leaves. 1 Researchers have noted that unripe papaya latex acts like prostaglandin and oxytocin, which the body makes to start labor. 2 Synthetic prostaglandin and oxytocin are commonly used to start or strengthen labor contractions.

    References
    Citations
    Papaya (2004). In DerMarderosian A, Beutler J, eds., Review of Natural Products. St. Louis: Wolters Kluwer Health.

    Adebiyi A, et al. (2002). Papaya (Carica papaya) consumption is unsafe in pregnancy: Fact or fable? Scientific evaluation of a common belief in some parts of Asia using a rat model. British Journal of Nutrition, 88(2): 199203.


    Hopefully, this will put your fears to rest.
    ~azcountrymum~

  3. #3
    New Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    13
    Hi azcountrymum,
    Many thanks for replying. Your answers are very helpful, indeed.
    I am loving to be a part of this forum.

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