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  1. #1

    dummy : what to do?

    With my first bub I hadn`t problems with bubís dummy, because he didn`t take it. But my second bub is eager for baby`s dummy. I wonder isn`t it harmful for his teeth? And when and how to break of this habit?

  2. #2
    Babies need to suckle a lot in the first few months of life. If they are not able to get enough sucking at the breast, then they will need to suck on a dummy. My babies gave up the dummy at 5 months of age, but I didn't use it very often.

    I would encourage you to put your baby to the breast more often. Wearing your baby will make this easier, as many mums can breastfeed while wearing their babies. If you can't breastfeed while wearing your baby, then you will at least know when he needs to be put to the breast because you will immediately be aware of his cues. Don't put baby off when he gives signs of being hungry. Just put him to the breast each time. You may find he doesn't need the dummy as much, and this will help to stimulate your milk supply which is important in anticipation of your return to work, when you will be spending time away from him.

    He will probably need the dummy while you are at work, to help soothe him because you won't be able to breastfeed him while you are away. But this won't last for too long. I think that need to suck stops around 5 or 6 months. Many babies continue to take a dummy after this because parents offer it often and maybe because they have become attached to it. But my guess (from what I've seen in my own children and in others) is that the need to pacify greatly lessens at 5 to 6 months of age. They will still need to suck from the breast to get milk, but this is different from needing to "constantly" pacify/suck on something, which seems to be greater in the early weeks/months of life.

  3. #3
    Babies need to suckle a lot in the first few months of life. If they are not able to get enough sucking at the breast, then they will need to suck on a dummy. My babies gave up the dummy at 5 months of age, but I didn't use it very often.

    I would encourage you to put your baby to the breast more often. Wearing your baby will make this easier, as many mums can breastfeed while wearing their babies. If you can't breastfeed while wearing your baby, then you will at least know when he needs to be put to the breast because you will immediately be aware of his cues. Don't put baby off when he gives signs of being hungry. Just put him to the breast each time. You may find he doesn't need the dummy as much, and this will help to stimulate your milk supply which is important in anticipation of your return to work, when you will be spending time away from him.

    He will probably need the dummy while you are at work, to help soothe him because you won't be able to breastfeed him while you are away. But this won't last for too long. I think that need to suck stops around 5 or 6 months. Many babies continue to take a dummy after this because parents offer it often and maybe because they have become attached to it. But my guess (from what I've seen in my own children and in others) is that the need to pacify greatly lessens at 5 to 6 months of age. They will still need to suck from the breast to get milk, but this is different from needing to "constantly" pacify/suck on something, which seems to be greater in the early weeks/months of life.

  4. #4
    Thank you, 5Homebirths4Kate. It is very useful infomation and not only for me. Hope your advises will help me in my solving the problem.

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