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  1. #1

    9 month old and solids

    Is it appropriate for a child not to eat semi-solid foods even if she's already 9 months old?

  2. #2
    Dear fraulein06,

    From six months of age and if a baby is developmentally ready (sitting up unaided, reaching out for food, able to grab onto small objects) you can start introducing solid food to your baby. This should be alongside the baby's milk. Breastmilk is best and baby's benefit from the nutritional, emotional and social advantages of breastmilk to two years of age and beyond. If you baby has formula milk rather than breastmilk then this should still be their main source of nutrients up to 12 months of age.

    There is an excellent book called Baby Led Weaning by Gill Rapley which explains this principle of introducing solid food to your baby from around 6 months of age and letting them play and explore the food without any need to mush or liquidise it. With baby led weaning, a baby should be offered food when they are not hungry (for example, they could have their milk feed around 1 hour before eating) and not tired. Babies younger than 12 months will not be able to associate food with stopping hunger and it is above all a time of developmental play for them. Babies can get over 90% of their required nutrients from their breastmilk up to 12 months of age.

    Is your daughter breastfed or formula fed?

    I am not sure of your main question in your post. Are you worried that your daughter is eating no mushy food and only solid food? This would be fine. Or are you concerned that she doesn't eat much food at all? If she still is breastfed on demand (day and night) then I would not be concerned about this either. Sometimes it is not until babies reach around 10 months of age that they start actually swallowing the food. Have your daughter's poos become more solid?

    As long as you are offering your daughter a wide variety of fresh, healthy food at regular times throughout the day that is what really matters. What food do you currently offer your baby?

    Please do post back so I can help you further with this.

    I am passionate about baby led weaning and interested in all forms of weaning and supporting parents in this process.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

  3. #3

    Feeding Problems

    Good day!

    My baby is formula feed. She's 9months old and she doesn't eat any semi or solid foods. Whenever we feed her, she vomits. She only drinks milk. Whatever we do, we cannot let her eat. Are there any ways to convince her and bring out her appetite? Thank you so much. I am so happy to be here in your forum. I have learned a lot already.

    Best Regards,
    Novelyn

    Quote Originally Posted by ljmarsden View Post
    Dear fraulein06,

    From six months of age and if a baby is developmentally ready (sitting up unaided, reaching out for food, able to grab onto small objects) you can start introducing solid food to your baby. This should be alongside the baby's milk. Breastmilk is best and baby's benefit from the nutritional, emotional and social advantages of breastmilk to two years of age and beyond. If you baby has formula milk rather than breastmilk then this should still be their main source of nutrients up to 12 months of age.

    There is an excellent book called Baby Led Weaning by Gill Rapley which explains this principle of introducing solid food to your baby from around 6 months of age and letting them play and explore the food without any need to mush or liquidise it. With baby led weaning, a baby should be offered food when they are not hungry (for example, they could have their milk feed around 1 hour before eating) and not tired. Babies younger than 12 months will not be able to associate food with stopping hunger and it is above all a time of developmental play for them. Babies can get over 90% of their required nutrients from their breastmilk up to 12 months of age.

    Is your daughter breastfed or formula fed?

    I am not sure of your main question in your post. Are you worried that your daughter is eating no mushy food and only solid food? This would be fine. Or are you concerned that she doesn't eat much food at all? If she still is breastfed on demand (day and night) then I would not be concerned about this either. Sometimes it is not until babies reach around 10 months of age that they start actually swallowing the food. Have your daughter's poos become more solid?

    As long as you are offering your daughter a wide variety of fresh, healthy food at regular times throughout the day that is what really matters. What food do you currently offer your baby?

    Please do post back so I can help you further with this.

    I am passionate about baby led weaning and interested in all forms of weaning and supporting parents in this process.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

  4. #4
    Thank you for your reply fraulein06.

    I need to ask you some more questions to help us get to the bottom of this.

    Have you tried giving your daughter finger food? For example, steamed vegetable sticks or roast chicken hunks or pieces of banana, apple or pear?

    Is your daughter actually vomiting properly after every time she tries food or just gagging? If she is properly vomiting then she could have a food allergy or a food intolerance. I would have her checked with your health professional. If she is just gagging (and perhaps vomiting a little with this) then you may find it useful to know that this is more common with spoon fed babies and so you may find swapping to baby led weaning helpful.

    Did your daughter have problems with vomiting when she only had formula milk? At this age, it is important that your daughter gets most of her nutrients from her milk. What is essential is that you focus on your daughter getting enough milk.

    What age did you start giving your daughter food? Was it 6 months? Has she always found food difficult to keep down? Is your daughter well and happy otherwise? Does she produce plenty of wet and dirty nappies?

    Sorry, I'm still unsure from your post if your daughter is sick even when she just has her milk? If this is the case then please do see your doctor. It could be that she has reflux. This can be helped by feeding your baby in an upright position, burping your baby more frequently and giving your baby smaller more frequent feeds. Your doctor may also advise some medication for your baby if the reflux is severe. With reflux, it does reduce as the baby gets older and as they start eating more and more solid food. Is reflux something you have considered?

    Warm wishes,
    LJ
    Last edited by ljmarsden; 24th October 2013 at 05:07 AM.

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