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  1. #1
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    When to stop breastfeeding

    Hello,

    I have a 22 months old daughter. I am still breastfeeding my daughter until now, and I plan to continue until she is 2 years old. When is the best time to stop breastfeeding and how to do it? Because she is very addicted with my breast, she even can't sleep before I breastfeeding her.

    Thanks for sharing
    Last edited by Adinda; 31st October 2013 at 06:09 PM.

  2. #2
    Hi Adinda,

    Congratulations on breastfeeding for 22 months! Breastfeeding a toddler is a wonderful bonding experience and has great benefits for your daughter.

    I had one baby that breastfed until about 3 years of age, and three babies that breastfed until 2 1/2 years of age. They all self weaned, which means that they became distracted with other things as they got older, and would forget about a feeding.

    My babies always enjoyed breastfeeding before going to sleep, so the first feedings to go were the ones in between naps and at night. The last feedings to go were the ones before going down for a nap, going down at night, and waking up in the morning. Those are all precious times to cuddle and don't interfere with mum's "me" time. I would keep those as long as baby wants.

    As long as you are offering nutritious food for baby (high quality fats, protein, fruits and vegetables, with just a little carbohydrates) your baby should be able to fill up on solids without needing breast milk as her main food.

    Here's a video showing you a very nutritious way to get fruits and vegetables into your baby's diet. Babies and toddlers LOVE green smoothies!


  3. #3
    Well done Adinda - you should feel proud that you are giving your daughter the very best in your breastmilk.

    Children get huge nutritional, developmental, social and emotional advantages from breastmilk in the first and second year of life and beyond. One study (by Dewey in 2001) found that in the second year of life 448 ml of breastmilk gives a toddler:

    75% of vitamin A requirements
    36% of calcium requirements
    29% of energy requirements
    43% of protein requirements
    76% of folate requirements
    94% of vitamin B12 requirements
    60% of vitamin C requirements

    You mention in your other post that I have replied to that your daughter does not always swallow her food. Breastfeeding her means you can be happy that she is getting many nutrients from her milk.

    You also mention the link between breastfeeding and sleep for your daughter. This is very common and normal. However, breastfeeding is a relationship between mum and baby and if the sleep association with breastmilk is something that you are no longer happy with then I can recommend the No Cry Sleep Solution by Elizabeth Pantley. Here is an excerpt from this book.

    Pantley writes about a technique where you feed your baby until she is nearly asleep and then unlatch her and wait up to 10 seconds to see if she settles if she doesn't you give her the breast again and repeat. The aim is to gradually and gently get her to stop actually falling asleep at the breast until she is eventually happy with just being cuddled to sleep/ put down to sleep. I would really recommend this book in light of what you describe.

    Thinking of you,
    LJ

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljmarsden View Post
    Well done Adinda - you should feel proud that you are giving your daughter the very best in your breastmilk.

    Children get huge nutritional, developmental, social and emotional advantages from breastmilk in the first and second year of life and beyond. One study (by Dewey in 2001) found that in the second year of life 448 ml of breastmilk gives a toddler:

    75% of vitamin A requirements
    36% of calcium requirements
    29% of energy requirements
    43% of protein requirements
    76% of folate requirements
    94% of vitamin B12 requirements
    60% of vitamin C requirements

    You mention in your other post that I have replied to that your daughter does not always swallow her food. Breastfeeding her means you can be happy that she is getting many nutrients from her milk.

    You also mention the link between breastfeeding and sleep for your daughter. This is very common and normal. However, breastfeeding is a relationship between mum and baby and if the sleep association with breastmilk is something that you are no longer happy with then I can recommend the No Cry Sleep Solution by Elizabeth Pantley. Here is an excerpt from this book.

    Pantley writes about a technique where you feed your baby until she is nearly asleep and then unlatch her and wait up to 10 seconds to see if she settles if she doesn't you give her the breast again and repeat. The aim is to gradually and gently get her to stop actually falling asleep at the breast until she is eventually happy with just being cuddled to sleep/ put down to sleep. I would really recommend this book in light of what you describe.

    Thinking of you,
    LJ
    Hi LJ,

    Will try to do that. Thank you so much

  5. #5
    You are very welcome.

    Let me know how you get on!

    Thinking of you,
    LJ

  6. #6
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    Thank you so much LJ

  7. #7
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    Wow! That's your lucky, my son only breastfeed around 1 month. I have to stop breastfeeding him because he had allergy. Then I consulted the doctor what happen, then I told the doctor that I drink coffee and whenever I eat chocolates because sometimes i have a craving I cannot resist. So, that's the cause of his allergy. I drink coffee because I have to stay awake in the morning because, you know I'm a single mum taking care of my bub alone. Thank goodness I'm done with that

    Thanks,

    Loann

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by loanngab View Post
    Wow! That's your lucky, my son only breastfeed around 1 month. I have to stop breastfeeding him because he had allergy. Then I consulted the doctor what happen, then I told the doctor that I drink coffee and whenever I eat chocolates because sometimes i have a craving I cannot resist. So, that's the cause of his allergy. I drink coffee because I have to stay awake in the morning because, you know I'm a single mum taking care of my bub alone. Thank goodness I'm done with that

    Thanks,

    Loann
    Dear Loann,

    so sorry to hear that, but that's ok as long as your son knows that you love him so much

    cheers.
    Adinda

  9. #9
    Dear Loann,

    I'm sorry to hear you had difficulties breastfeeding your son. The early days can be very difficult.

    It is actually fine to drink caffeine and eat chocolate when breastfeeding; although it is wise to eat and drink these in moderation. There are no foods that breastfeeding mums should absolutely ignore.

    Allergies to something in the mum's diet (by a breastfed baby) are very rare. Signs of this would be excessive vomiting and a rash as well as colic. It is most likely when there is a family history of allergies. The baby may also have mucous or blood in his poo. But hardly any breastfeeding mums will see these as it is, as I say, extremely rare.

    The most likely food allergy in breastfed babies (although this is still obviously rare) is to cow's milk. Mum can then eliminate this from her diet and, in most cases, successfully continue with breastfeeding.

    I really hope your doctor didn't simply say because you ate chocolates and coffee you could not breastfeed as this is not the case. Unfortunately not all health professionals are well-trained in the latest breastfeeding knowledge.

    For any new breastfeeding mums reading this thread; if you have any problems we would highly recommend you consult a lactation consultant who is extremely well-trained in everything concerning breastfeeding.

    That must have been so hard as a single mum with a new baby Loann - you should feel proud of the breastmilk you gave your son in the first month.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

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