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  1. #1
    New Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    10

    How to get bub to nap in her cot?

    Our daughter is now 3 months old. She has been co-sleeping with us from 2 weeks as she never did take to her cot. Recently, she does not even nap in her cot. I am not sure if this is just a phase she is going through. How do I get her to nap in her cot without using a cry it out method?

  2. #2
    At 3 months of age, I found that my babies simply wanted to be close to me, and the easiest thing to do was to breastfeed baby to sleep, and then put her down. If she would wake up when I put her down, then I found that laying on my bed, with baby next to me, and breastfeeding her to sleep worked well. She would fall asleep at the breast, and then I would unlatch her and she would stay asleep on the bed because I didn't have to move her.

    Sometimes, if I didn't want to lay down to put baby to sleep, I would breastfeed and then put her in the swing and she would nap in the swing. Newborns and infants love motion, so the swing worked quite well.

    I recently learned of a new product which seems to be very helpful in getting babies to sleep in their cot. It's called Munchkin Lulla-Vibe Vibrating Mattress Pad.

    Dr. Ben Kim recently posted a review of the Vibrating Mattress Pad on his website, along with a testimony from parents who tried this product and loved it!

    I had a family bed with my babies for many years, but around 1 year of age I would transition them out of my bed by starting to put them down in their own cot for naps.

    Hope this helps - please post back if you need more help.

    Warm Regards,

    Kate

  3. #3
    Dear MumtoZoe,

    Have a read of Pinky McKay's article 'Co-sleeping, is it part of bonding?'. Pinky writes:

    'When my own babies were small, neither social ideology nor wakeful babies caused me a lack of sleep – my babies slept snuggled up with me at night.'

    I love this quote and I come back to it tima and time again. There seems so much pressure on parents (and so pressure on babies) to be 'sleeping through the night' (whereas all babies actually normally wake briefly throughout the night as do adults even if we cant remember it) and sleeping in their own cot. Yes there are safe sleeping guidelines to be followed but sleeping close to your baby means you can breastfed them with ease and sooth them with ease.

    My baby often naps in his sling or in the pushchair in the daytime.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

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