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  1. #1

    Breastfeed my newborn for six months

    I have been advised by doctors to breastfeed my newborn for the first six months. I have been attending classes on breastfeeding in the hospital on my check ups. I would love to breastfeed my baby. However, I have heard that mums need to eat and drink a lot during the stage of breastfeeding. My question is whether it is necessary to take supplements or not.

  2. #2
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    Asrathiel's Avatar
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    While pregnant and breastfeeding, your body will give nutrients to the baby first- you could be living on coke and chips and breastfeeding your baby, and they'd be fine- but it wouldn't be so healthy for you!

    It's not necessary, usually, to take supplements, as long as you're eating a decent diet. It doesn't have to be all expensive organic yadda yadda- just a normal mostly healthy diet. Breastfeeding does slightly increase your nutritional needs, but not as much as people seem to think. There's no special 'breastfeeding' diet that you need to follow in order to make 'good milk' for your baby.

    It's always good to have water with you when you sit down to breastfeed though, as you will get thirsty.

    The WHO guidelines advise exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months, and then breastfeeding + some food from then on, with breastfeeding continuing until at least 2 years. 6 months is a great goal to start with, and there's no need to stop while you and your baby are both happy continuing! The thought of feeding a toddler can seem daunting when you have a tiny newborn, but once you get to that stage, it won't seem strange at all- just a lovely (and very useful) part of your relationship with your child.

    Make sure you have good information and support- these are the keys to successful breastfeeding.
    R, mama to M (8), Z (5.5), and bellybabe due Jan 2014

  3. #3
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    Asrathiel's Avatar
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    oops double post
    R, mama to M (8), Z (5.5), and bellybabe due Jan 2014

  4. #4
    Thank you for your advise.

  5. #5
    Yes. Studies have shown that mums who sadly don't have access to adequate food supplies (in terms of meeting all their nutritional needs) still produce enough breastmilk for their babies and there is no affect on the nutritional make-up of the breastmilk. A woman's body will make sure her baby is fed well before meeting her own nutritional needs.

    That said, many mums find they are very thirsty when they start breastfeeding. This was certainly the case for me with my first (although interestingly not with my second when I was tandem feeding) and I would become instantly thirsty as soon as my baby latched on. I learnt to have a water bottle within reach with a sports cap on the top that I could open with my mouth and just one hand. Actually, in the very early days I found that I needed two hands to breastfeed so my husband would feed me water.

    We love supporting mums to breastfeed on this forum so any question you have (no matter how big or small!) please post here.

    Best wishes,
    LJ

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