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Thread: Breastfeeding

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  1. #1
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    Breastfeeding

    What if you want to breastfeed but the bub refuses time and time again?

  2. #2
    Dear learnaboutbabies,

    Are you asking about a newborn/ very young baby not wanting to breastfeed or a toddler/ older child?

    Newborn and young babies do not refuse the breast. They may need help with breastfeeding (it really is a skill for both mother and baby to master) but this is very different. The most common breastfeeding problem is a problem with the latch. This can be helped by professionals such as: midwives, breastfeeding support workers, health visitors and lactation consultants.

    Please have a look at this detailed post about breastfeeding in the early days.

    If you choose for your child to wean themselves from breastfeeding then at some point they will choose to naturally stop breastfeeding. This is likely to be between age 3 and 4 for true child-led weaning.

    Breastfeeding on demand is the best way to establish and have a long, happy breastfeeding relationship.

    Please do post back and let me know if this answers your question and what age baby/child you were referring to in your original post.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

  3. #3
    New Member

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    Dear LJ,

    I was referring to a newborn. I saw my sister struggle to breastfeed her two newborns despite help from a nurse. I will look at the post you suggested. Thank you.

    learnaboutbabies

  4. #4
    Senior Member

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    I would like to suggest that any new mother make sure she gets adequate support early on, as soon as baby is born, making sure that the baby is offered the breast with in the first hour after birth.
    This will ensure that the baby has the most alert state to latch on.
    If mum finds that her little one is not latching, then putting baby and mum in skin to skin for several hours till baby starts to respond by lifting head and rooting around mums skin.
    This is a hunger cue and baby tends to latch quickly from skin to skin care.

    I hope that this information finds you well and interested in learning more about breastfeeding your little one.

    Blessings

  5. #5
    New Member

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    I appreciate your help and suggestions. I will keep that in mind.


    QUOTE=sunnymumof5;11629]I would like to suggest that any new mother make sure she gets adequate support early on, as soon as baby is born, making sure that the baby is offered the breast with in the first hour after birth.
    This will ensure that the baby has the most alert state to latch on.
    If mum finds that her little one is not latching, then putting baby and mum in skin to skin for several hours till baby starts to respond by lifting head and rooting around mums skin.
    This is a hunger cue and baby tends to latch quickly from skin to skin care.

    I hope that this information finds you well and interested in learning more about breastfeeding your little one.

    Blessings[/QUOTE]

  6. #6
    I'm so sorry to hear that your sister struggled with breastfeeding learnaboutbabies.

    I totally agree with sunnymumof5 that good breastfeeding support, particularly in the early days, is absolutely key. Perhaps the best health professional to help a new mum at the start of her breastfeeding time is a lactation consultant. Research also shows that the help from breastfeeding peer support workers is vital. Any nurse, doctor or even midwife who helps with breastfeeding support should have full and up-to-date breastfeeding knowledge; unfortunately this is not always the case. It is best if the health professional helping has a real passion about breastfeeding and is a 'breastfeeding champion'.

    Do have a look at that link above in my previous comments as it points to lots of additional information about breastfeeding in the early days.

    Do you know what particular problems your sister had with breastfeeding?

    Breastfeeding does take some time, and frequently tonnes of support, for mum and baby to master but it is so worth it when you get there. My overall advice would be to keep asking for help from as many health professionals as possible. Attend a breastfeeding support group in late pregnancy so that you know the support is available and where to go when you need it. Also, become as well-informed on breastfeeding as possible so that you are aware of the latest research and recommendations.

    With warm wishes,
    LJ

  7. #7
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    With reference to your question, the babies refused to latch on the breast.

  8. #8
    I'm sorry to hear this. A good latch can take a good deal of support from breastfeeding professionals. In particular, babies who are tongue tied may need extra help or their tongue tie being cut (a simple procedure) to help them to latch on properly. Although breastfeeding is certainly the most natural and best way for babies to feed it does not always come easily. Many women require support from numerous healthcare professionals (including lactation consultants, peer support workers and breastfeeding specialist midwives).

    If there is a physical reason why a latch cannot be achieved then there is always the option to express breastmilk and feed this to your baby. Some women exclusively express breastmilk for their baby in the first 6 months. This does require dedication and support but gives a baby the wonderful health benefits of breastmilk if it truly is not possible to obtain a good latch.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

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