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  1. #1
    New Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    11

    Toddler aversion to texture

    My toddler eats a wide variety of foods, but does not like lettuces and salads. He will spit them out. I think he has an aversion to the texture, as he does it with cooked spinach, various cooked green, and fresh salads. Does anyone have any tips/tricks to share?

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    476
    momtomax,

    From the little research I've done on toddlers and food aversion, it seems fairly normal for toddlers to experience all different sorts of food aversions and texture issues.

    Seems fairly common across the board. i suggest that you continue to respect your child's desires and choices when it comes to food.
    Offering new and different food choices every so often and going with your toddlers flow.

    Just remember that each child will eat a new food when he or she is ready. As a parent I want my child to feel safe and secure when it comes to food choices and decisions.
    We include our children in meal planning and try to always have a wide range of foods available at all times. This way the child is able to choose what food he or she desires at any given moment.
    A free for all as one may describe it.

    Here is the article, I think you will find some great information.

    http://www.nutrition411.com/specials...d-selectivity/


    Blessings

  3. #3
    Hi momtomax,

    I think lettuce (and spinach etc) is quite a common food for toddlers to actually find difficult to eat (rather than having an aversion to its texture). It is hard for a toddler to bite into this type of food which is why they will often just suck on it a bit and then spit it out.

    A great way to make greens more accessible and, easier to consume, for toddler's is to offer a green smoothie. Green smoothies are well-loved by many of our forum members and their children. Have a look at this previous thread on making green smoothies.

    I agree with sunnymumof5 not to force any particular food on our children. It is better in the long run to help them adopt a healthy attitude to meal and snack times and help them to make healthy choices. This is why a healthy 'grazing plate' works well for toddlers. This is an idea put forward by the Attachment Parenting Paediatrician Dr. Sears where the toddler has access to a plate of healthy, interesting snacks all day long. This often is successful because toddlers get bored easily and want to be on the go all day long.

    In our household we adopt a double approach to fruit and vegetables. I offer them to my boys so that they learn to choose vegetables and fruit and enjoy their varying textures. I also then cook them within food so that I am sure they are getting their daily requirements (such as in roast vegetable sauces to go with pasta).

    Do post back and let us know how you get on.
    Warm wishes,
    LJ

  4. #4
    New Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    11
    great ideas- thanks!

  5. #5
    You are very welcome. Hope it helps your little man.

    Warm wishes,
    LJ

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