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  1. #1
    New Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    10

    Nipple Confusion

    Hi, I just want to share my breastfeeding experience and seek advise from experts here.

    When I gave birth to my son, he was immediately admitted in the NICU due to his cardiac condition. He was delivered through CS and it took three days before I finally lactate. The NICU nurses had bottle fed him since day 1.

    I tried to breastfeed him but he did not want my nipple. I tried every technique I read from books and the internet, but still he cried whenever I offer my breast. It was very frustrating and I thought that was the cause of my postpartum depression.

    Then I decided to give up and bought a hospital grade breast pump. After a month, my milk supply decreased.

    My breastfeeding experience was definitely not a good one. I was an overwhelmed new mum.

    I am planning to get pregnant next year and hopefully, this forum would help me to a successful breastfeeding.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    655
    bella,

    I am so sorry to hear about your infant and his cardiac condition. I do hope that he is growing and doing well.

    What you have describe is a very common occurrence with babies who start off in the NICU. With the proper support from a Lactation Consultant most babies will take to the breast after some time on the bottle. It can take several weeks to months before the infant becomes comfortable with only the breast.

    I understand that you worked very hard by pumping and providing your little one with your expressed breast milk. How wonderful that your infant was able to get your milk in those early days. Pumping is quite a bit of work for a mom with a new born baby.

    I highly suggest that you seek out support from forums like this one and find a area Lactation Support system in your area. Early support makes for a longer breastfeeding relationship.

    I'm so happy that you have found this site, please continue to seek out the support that all mothers need. Mom to mom support is my favorite go to system when ever I am having questions or concerns about mothering.

    Happy Mothering

  3. #3
    New Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    10
    sunnymumof5,

    Thanks for your helpful response.

    Yes, my child is growing very healthy and well. Thank God.

    I am excited to have a newborn again and at that time, I am positive that I will be ready and well-informed.

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    655
    Oh any time you need any advice please feel free to ask away.
    Yes new born babies are such a wonderful blessing.

  5. #5
    I'm so sorry you had this experience bella. It sounds like you may not have had all the breastfeeding support that you needed in those very important early days. How wonderful to hear your son is doing well!

    Breastmilk does not tend to fully 'come in' until day three following birth. On day three a woman's breasts will suddenly feel a lot fuller and she will be aware of producing lots of breastmilk. A newborn baby's stomach is so tiny that even the tiny drips of colostrum (the first milk - this is often termed 'Nature's Perfect Milk') will be rich enough to fill its delicate stomach during days 1-3. As sunnymumof5 suggests above; I would highly recommend getting in touch with a Lactation Consultant if you have any problems or difficulties at all in breastfeeding.

    Whilst breastfeeding is natural and undoubtedly the best way of feeding a baby, it often takes a lot of support and practice in the first 1-2 months. It is a skill that mum and baby need to learn.

    Getting the latch right is absolutely key and you need someone experienced and supportive in breastfeeding to check this for you and to help you with this. I previously wrote a detailed reply to this thread about getting the latch right in the early days. This thread also has some useful links and resources.

    In terms of expressing, one point to remember is that no breastpump will be as efficient as a baby at extracting breastmilk from the breast. Breastmilk works on a supply and demand basis; the more breastmilk is extracted from the breast the more breastmilk will be produced. This means that you need to be pumping breastmilk from the breast often enough to simulate a baby's feeds. For newborn babies this is approximately every 2-3 hours.

    You gave your son some breastmilk in difficult medical conditions - this should be celebrated. Every breastfeed matters!

    With warm wishes,
    LJ
    Last edited by ljmarsden; 11th August 2014 at 07:30 AM.

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