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  1. #1

    Language development-delayed?

    Hi,

    My nephew is already two years old, he is very active, he can already climb the stairs, walk and run fast, jump etc. but me and my sister in law are concerned because he can't still talk like most child of his age. Is that normal? What can we do to help him develop his language ability? I also noticed that he can understand simple commands like to put his toys in place, he can also hear what we say because he reacts.

    Looking forward for your answers and tips. We really need your help.
    Thank you.

    Jennifer

  2. #2
    Hi Jennifer,

    I have learned that all children really do develop at their own pace. My youngest daughter has been somewhat delayed with her speech, as well. She is over the age of two and it is still hard to understand what she says. She has finally just started trying to talk more, when she wouldn't even try to say certain words a few months ago.

    How many words does your nephew say? Does your nephew try to put two words together?

    What we try to do is talk to her a lot, We often ask her questions, to try and get her to say an answer. ("Do you want to drink water or milk?" or "Do you want the pink shirt or the purple shirt?") We also say a lot of words to her. When we go through the store, I will say what things are and see if she can repeat the word. We also talk about the colors of things and we try counting how many of something there is. We also like to read books together with all of the children.

    Here is some information about language delay (what to look for, types of language delay) from the Raising Children Network.

    Here is a great article that is posted here about ways to encourage language development.

    If your nephew is trying to say some words and tries to put two words together, I would probably just continue trying to use strategies to work on language development at home. If your nephew is not saying words at all or only says a few, then it may be worth mentioning to a doctor.

    Speech Pathology Australia has a lot of articles on how to help language development and what a communication disability is. They also have links to find a speech pathologist.

  3. #3
    Hi Jennifer,

    Jessica posted some great suggestions and resources for you. Love it!

    My nephew didn't say anything until he was 3, and then one day, he just started talking. It's as if someone flipped a switch in his little brain.

    I was concerned about my first child (due to her cousin not speaking until he was 3) and I had her tested when she was 2. The woman who came to our home and did the test said she was actually advanced in her cognitive development and that I shouldn't be concerned about her speach, that she was right on target for her age. I suppose that because she was my first, I simply didn't know what to expect from her (though I had been around plenty of 2 1/2 year olds when I worked as an Office Manager in a preschool). She ended up having a very large vocabulary and now (in her 2nd year of college) she enjoys English very much and does editing and proofreading for others.

    If you want to put your mind at ease you could have your son tested, but I'd probably wait until he's at least 2 1/2, and maybe even 3 because, as Jessica mentioned, children develop at their own unique paces.

    Warm regards,

    Kate

  4. #4
    The information that Kate and Jessica provided as great. Wanted to mention that when we were learning about screening for disorders during college (I used to be a teacher), we were told that boys generally develop language slower than girls, but motor skills faster. My boys were a bit over two before they started to speak clearly and frequently. I wouldn't worry too much about it at this point. The general standard is that a boy should have speech that is around 99% clear by four.

  5. #5
    Hi jennifer24,

    I'm an Audiologist and have worked with a number of Speech and Language Therapists. You've had some super advice from the ladies above. I also wanted to add that speech comprehension (i.e. understanding instructions and commands) come significantly earlier than speech production. As others have said, each child develops at their own pace. Also, some children are just more talkative than others!

    However, if you are still concerned then many speech and language departments have drop in sessions where they can assess your child's speech. You can also access these through your GP.

    LJ

  6. #6

    Language Development

    Quote Originally Posted by ljmarsden View Post
    Hi jennifer24,

    I'm an Audiologist and have worked with a number of Speech and Language Therapists. You've had some super advice from the ladies above. I also wanted to add that speech comprehension (i.e. understanding instructions and commands) come significantly earlier than speech production. As others have said, each child develops at their own pace. Also, some children are just more talkative than others!

    However, if you are still concerned then many speech and language departments have drop in sessions where they can assess your child's speech. You can also access these through your GP.

    LJ
    Thank you so much for all the information you've given me. It helps me a lot. But, just for follow up question, I noticed that he keeps on drooling, is it also normal? Can it affects his language ability? Or it is something to be check by a pediatrician?

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