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  1. #1
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    Apr 2012
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    Best time to determine the final position of your baby inside your womb?

    Hi! When is the best time to determine the final position of your baby inside your womb before you give birth? Is it possible that changes can happen during your labor period?

    Thanks,
    Anne
    Last edited by Anne; 3rd May 2012 at 05:16 PM.

  2. #2
    Hi Anne,

    Babies can change position during labour. With my first baby, she was posterior (facing up) going into labour, and I had back labour with her. When I was about 4cm dialated, my midwife turned her by inserting her first two fingers into my vagina and placing one on each side of my baby's head (my bag was still intact). To picture this, make a "peace sign" with your first two fingers, then picture putting one finger on either side of baby's head.

    Then she used one hand on the outside of my belly to help rotate baby, while turning her other hand, and the baby's body followed as the head turned to an anterior position (best position for baby and mom). Once baby's head was properly positioned on my cervix, I went from 4cm to 6cm immediately.

    I got into a warm bath at that point, and my baby actually flip flopped on her own - going back to a posterior position and then turning to an anterior position. She was in an anterior position when I started pushing which was good.

    With my last baby (#5) my baby was laying in more of a sideways position when I went into labour. My midwife had be in some positions during some contractions to help baby move into a proper anterior position and she moved into those positions on her own during that labour.

    When I attended a friend's birth, I remember walking into the room and seeing her on her hands and knees with a bag of frozen peas on her back. Babies will sometimes move away from the cold and turn into a proper position on their own this way. Again, this was during labour.

    It's really important to have a midwife, doula or labour coach who is familiar with spinning babies and can be with you during labour. The more you can do naturally, the less chance of needing an intervention. Sadly, once one intervention is started, it can lead to another, having a domino affect, so that you end up having a number of interventions (sometimes ending up in a C-Section).

    Here are a couple of videos that demonstrate how to naturally turn or "spin" a baby.





    Let me know if that answered your question.

    Warm regards,

    Kate

  3. #3
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    It's really important to have a midwife, doula or labour coach who is familiar with spinning babies and can be with you during labour. The more you can do naturally, the less chance of needing an intervention. Sadly, once one intervention is started, it can lead to another, having a domino affect, so that you end up having a number of interventions (sometimes ending up in a C-Section).
    Thanks Kate. I agree with the importance of having a midwife during labour. I delivered my first baby via vaginal birth at the hospital due to high blood pressure and I was expecting that I would have my second one the same way. But I ended up with C-Section for my second delivery. I was in labour for about 8 hours. My cervix was opening from 4cm-8cm. It was unstable for it would go back to 4cm again. Later they noticed that the heartbeat of my baby was decreasing and so my doctor decided for me to undergo C-Section. When my baby came out, the cord was coiled twice on his neck...choking him and a little fecal matter already came out. I was very happy that he was okay and didn't have complications afterwards. I was fine too.

    I was wondering then all this time why my doctor didn't figure it out a few days before my scheduled delivery for I had an ultrasound check and they baby was seen on a normal position then and no cord coiled on his neck. I thought perhaps the baby moved too much during my labour that he ended up entangled with his cord. Maybe if there was a midwife with me, it could have been different and the C-Section intervention would have been unnecessary.

  4. #4
    Baby's change position during labour, and cord wraps are a fairly common occurence, usually non-threatening though it sounds like it was in your case. Since your birth was scheduled, I assume you mean induced? Inductions are known to sometimes cause baby to get in a bad position. This is because baby has not been permitted to reach their natural labor-prep position. Of course, considering your history of high blood pressure it may have been a very necessary induction. Having a midiwfe may have helped in some ways, but as far as the doctor seeing the baby's position with the ultrasound, they are not 100% conclusive and it was unlikely that the baby was already in that position.

  5. #5
    New Member

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    Apr 2012
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    Thank you mom2many for the insight you gave. This made me to consider positively of what happened to me and having a midwife with me on my future pregnancy.

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