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Pregnancy symptoms with twins

Pregnancy symptoms with twins

Being pregnant with twins poses specific problems for mothers. As a result specific pregnancy symptoms can arise with twins.

Women are more likely to suffer exacerbation of some of the common, but unpleasant symptoms of pregnancy. These include: heartburn, nausea and vomiting, backache, haemorrhoids, tiredness and general discomfort. The increased weight and size of the uterus are the main culprits when it comes to the increased rate of varicose veins, swelling in the legs, backache, heartburn and breathlessness women experience. There are aids like lightweight girdles and support tights that can help with some of these problems. Sleeping with an extra pillow at night may also help with the heartburn and breathlessness.

The increased size of the uterus can lead to a greater incidence of stretch marks as well. Women having twins are also more likely to suffer from anaemia. This is due to the fact that two growing babies make a greater demand on the mother’s iron stores. In order to monitor whether anaemia is developing, women will have blood tests at regular intervals during their pregnancy. Foods rich in iron and folic acid such as green leafy vegetables and red meat is encouraged. Iron and folic acid supplementation may be needed during pregnancy.

Pregnancy Symptoms with Twins Summary

  • Larger than average uterus (women usually measure larger during pregnancy visits than their singleton carrying counterparts)
  • Increased nausea and vomiting
  • Increased heartburn
  • Greater incidence of backache
  • Breathlessness
  • Increased swelling
  • Increased tiredness and general discomfort
  • Greater incidence of stretch marks
  • Anaemia


Page published 16th December 2011

Dr Hannah Dahlen is the Associate Professor of Midwifery at the University of Western Sydney. She has been a midwife for more than 20 years. Hannah is also an executive member of the Australian College of Midwives, NSW Branch. She has researched women's birth experiences at home and in hospital and published extensively in this area. Hannah's website is www.hannahdahlen.com.au

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