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Vaginal Birth After Caesarean (VBAC)

//Vaginal Birth After Caesarean (VBAC)
Vaginal Birth After Caesarean (VBAC)2019-05-06T04:31:15+00:00

Vaginal Birth After Caesarean (VBAC)

By Jane Palmer

Are you planning a vaginal birth after having a caesarean birth? If so, this is the section for you. I have pulled together information from our website and from the web to help inform and encourage you.

Emotions for women who achieve a VBAC are many. Indeed, most women feel a victory and a relief. Many women also feel a deep, profound sense of healing.

The World Health Organisation says no country should have a cesarean rate above 10-15%. However, in Australia we currently have caesarean birth rates in excess of 30% . This is totally unacceptable. It means that women are being subjected to unnecessary surgery.

Researching VBAC enables you to find out the real risks of vaginal birth and elective caesarean. Therefore, you can make an informed decision for you and your baby. Please browse the articles, stories, videos and links I’ve put together.

Resources

For further information on VBAC see:

VBAC Links

  • Birthrites: Healing After Caesarean Inc. This site aims of provide a support network for women who have had a previous caesarean section and to increase awareness of womens’ needs. There is lots of information on Vaginal Birth After Caesarean (VBAC) and offers contacts for women seeking a VBAC.
  • CANA The Caesarean Awareness Network Australia (CANA) is the vision of three Australian mothers who saw a need to provide a public voice on behalf of women who have had caesareans, women who are considering having a baby by caesarean and women planning to have a vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC).
  • VBAC.com This site aims to provide access to information from a variety of sources: scientific studies, professional guidelines, government reports, successful and safe established VBAC programs, and the midwifery model of care. Their goal is to help women make informed decisions about how they will give birth.
  • International Caesarean Awareness Network
    This is a collection of fact sheets and information put out by the International Caesarean Awareness Network (ICAN) and other sources. Information includes how to prevent an unnecessary caesarean, vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC), how to find resources in your community, information about ICAN, and how to become a part of ICAN.
  • Caesarean Birth and VBAC Information offers research-based information and support on all aspects of caesareans and vaginal birth following caesarean section.

Support Group

Information coming soon

VBAC Articles

Report review: Why the birth after caesarean randomised control trial is good news for VBAC

Report review: Why the birth after caesarean randomised control trial is good news for VBAC By Jillian Harris Spiky Hedgehog Photography In March 2012 the results of the controversial Birth After Caesarean Randomised Control Trial were finally published. The are are no big surprises in this report, but there are many questions that remain to be answered. What the researchers say the report says The researchers claim that, on balance, Elective Repeat Caesarean (ERC) has a lower risk of

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What are the implications of an increasing caesarean section rate for maternal and perinatal health?

What are the implications of an increasing caesarean section rate for maternal and perinatal health? By Hannah Dahlen In June 2007, NSW Health organised a statewide forum, Caesarean Section – Future Direction. The purpose of the multidisciplinary forum was to examine the rise in caesarean births within the public health system and to determine the future policy for caesarean birth in NSW. I, amongst others, was asked to speak at the forum on the implications of an increasing caesarean

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Caesareans linked to increased infertility

Caesareans linked to increased infertility A study published in the British Journal of Obstetrics (2002) found that three times more first time mothers who had a caesarean section suffered long-term infertility problems than women who had experienced a vaginal birth. The study also found that six times more first time mothers who underwent a caesarean section experienced trauma that was serious enough to prevent them having another baby compared to women who had a normal vaginal birth. In this

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How I Prepared for Birth After My Unplanned Caesarean

How I Prepared for Birth After My Unplanned Caesarean By Erika Munton My work as a doula started only after I had experienced the birth of my second child Bailey, which was a natural vaginal birth into water. The birth of my first child Karl was by caesarean section after a cascade of interventions in my attempt to have a normal vaginal breech birth. Becoming a busy mother did not afford me much time to stop and think back

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Vaginal Birth After Caesarean

Vaginal Birth After Caesarean By Hannah Dahlen “When Belle was born I went through such a mixture of emotions,” says Angela. “On the one hand I had this beautiful baby, and should have been so grateful, but on the other hand I had all this grief about what I had missed out on and what could have been. When people asked me about the birth I would say ‘I had to have a caesarean’ and they would often say

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Safety of Vaginal Birth After Three or More Caesareans

Many would acknowledge a general perception that attempting a vaginal birth after a caesarean (VBAC) carries unique risks. The prevalence of these risks is also perceived to increase with the number of prior caesareans a woman has experienced. It is no surprise then that a woman having experienced multiple caesareans is likely to face significant opposition to an attempted VBAC unless she chooses her midwife or doctor carefully. The most commonly acknowledged danger in attempting VBAC is that of

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VBAC Stories

The Bella Birth of Xander Blake Bromwich

The Bella Birth of Xander Blake Bromwich 31.10.12 at 1:49pm (39wks 4 days) 3.54kg - 52.5cm - Head 34cm Saturday 27th:  I notice many changes such as tender breasts and mucus turning from whitish to the fertile raw egg white kind. Sunday there was a bloody show (light pink tinge to the mucus). I remember telling Jaymes about it saying, “It will probably still be a couple of days yet but things are happening.” I’d also been getting lots

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The homebirth of Archie McGuire Wolfe

The homebirth of Archie McGuire Wolfe The homebirth of Archie McGuire Wolfe 06/08/12    12lb4oz (5.56kg) HBA4C My greatest achievements in life have been my 9 gorgeous children. Each of the journeys that delivered them to me has been unique. With each new pregnancy, my “risk” status grew in the eyes of healthcare providers & I became more determined each time to have the birth that I felt was not only mine by right, but what was best for myself,

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My birth story of Lucas

My birth story of Lucas By Carolynne Glover Just a brief history of prior births: 1st C-section - was induced because of back pain at 39w2d. Being my 1st, I didn't know any different and I thought my dr was doing what was best for me. On the night of the 2nd of March, I had the gel to get my cervix to ripen. By morning I was 2cm and ready to go. Around 8am on the 3rd of

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Why does it matter where and how women give birth?

Why does it matter where and how women give birth? By Bashi Hazard Thank you.  It is an absolute privilege to be with you today.  I am standing here before you because, in September last year, something remarkable happened to our family, something I am very eager to share with you today.  After 2 so-called emergency caesareans at one of Sydney’s premier private hospitals, I had a baby who weighed more than 4 kgs, naturally, and without intervention, with

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The Successful VBA4C Birth of Jamie Wolfe

The Successful VBA4C Birth of Jamie Wolfe Jamie Wolfe was born the 8th of March 2011 As a mother of 8 beautiful children, I have quite an extensive birth history. Before Jamie’s birth I had had 13 pregnancies - 3 vaginal births, 4 c/sections, 5 miscarriages & a successful VBA4C. Two of my c/sections were failed VBAC attempts. During the early stages of my pregnancy I was still very committed to another attempt at VBAC. I began researching more

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Lilli Amba Coombes – Tragic Story

Lilli Amba Coombes - Tragic Story Born 18/04/05 at 3.20am Weighing 8lb 8oz and 55cm long You were a complete surprise to us at first but how wonderful for Jack (your big brother now 3 ½) to have a play mate. At 6 ½ weeks we had our first scan and your due date was April 18th 2005. We didn’t want to know what sex you were as it’s the best surprise waiting and guessing. After having an emergency

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